Radical Roots: On Community Food Growing

0 PFT coverThis month a groundbreaking handbook about arts and social change burst onto the bookshelves. Playing for Time – Making Art as if the World Mattered by Lucy Neal was, like Sustainable Bungay, inspired by the world-wide Transition movement. As well as discussing the social and environmental drivers for change and giving detailed ‘Recipes for Action’,  the book charts the practices and projects of 64 contributing artists in 10 chapters, ranging from Land to Rites of Passage. Here to introduce the Food Growing chaper, SB co-founder and local food entrepreneur Josiah Meldrum, discusses the impact community growing (and eating) can have on our collective imaginations, looking at the origins of two SB projects, the  Library Courtyard Garden and Happy Mondays:

Back in the 1990s, when I first began work in community outreach for a small retail co-operative in Nottingham, I quickly learnt the power of food to connect people. I saw how, despite apparently very different backgrounds, people could share a passion and a purpose – whether it was about growing food organically, the social justice issues around fair trade or simply local access to good quality affordable food.

Most people feel powerless to effect the kind of big changes we desperately need to see. But I think that scale of change is within our grasp – it’s just a question of realising it and understanding the many (often very small) steps required to get there. In my experience food is often at the heart of those first steps, not only because it’s fundamental to all our lives but because shared meals, produce and growing spaces bring people together, reintroduce them to each other and, potentially, reconnect them with the way their food is produced and how it gets to their plate – even if it’s just a few radishes in a window box.

MAIN_BEN-TOVIM_PATCH OF GROUND_LONDON_Ruth BTThat feeling of doing something radical the first time you grow, harvest, cook and share something with your friends or family never really goes away. It’s the feeling that you have somehow evaded the corporate supply food chain; that you’re on the path to somewhere else. And from the point of taking control of the radishes in your salad, from securing a supply of food from local producers, you begin to take control of your dinner plate and the social, economic and environmental impact it has. Because taking our food into our own hands is a deeply political and potentially powerful act; it empowers us and makes a positive statement about how we want things to be. From this sense of agency we can exercise a lot more influence within our communities.

In the context of many Transition groups, it gives people a set of very immediate practices and a rationale to underpin what they are doing. In my own initiative of Sustainable Bungay we realised if that if we wanted to see local growers and producers flourish then we needed to demonstrate that by providing a market for their goods: by eating what they were growing. As a first step we set up a monthly community meal, ‘Happy Mondays’, which would highlight seasonal produce that was being grown in and around the town. Happy Mondays serves up 50 meals once a month, we celebrate local producers – from gardeners and allotmenteers to smallholders and farmers. But we also cook together, decorate the room, give talks about food growing and keeping hens, develop ideas, build friendships and strengthen our group.

What we have seen with Happy Mondays is that when people have gained some confidence about working together it also gives them the confidence to ask, ‘What other projects could we tackle?’. One occasional supplier to Happy Mondays is our own community garden. In 2010 the group ran a weekend introduction to permaculture and used as our case-study Bungay Library’s empty brick courtyard. 16 or 17 people came up with a design for a garden and then went about creating it. Now there are fruit trees and beds with flowers, vegetables and herbs, but it’s tiny – it’s not going to feed the town by any measure.

SeedLibrary2311Six months after we’d begun the process of creating the garden Suffolk County Council threatened to close our library if a volunteer group didn’t step up to run it for them. Suddenly there was a passionate group of people who’d organised and achieved something in that space. And they said: No, we’re not going to a) let the council close our library or b) let them assume that just because we’re interested in the library we want to run it. And we began a campaign that linked up with library groups all over the county and ultimately led to Suffolk County Council changing its policy.

Today our library is still open, still staffed by professional librarians and our community garden continues to flourish. All from the desire to grow some radishes. The community garden is a very visible manifestation of what Sustainable Bungay is all about. It’s a statement of intent. It’s saying, ‘We care about this space, we care about what happens in it and around it. And anyone can come in and join in.’

A garden is a physical presence in a community that’s visible to local politicians, community leaders, schoolchildren, everyone from faith groups to non-governmental organisations, many of whom may have no particular interest in food, but are interested in showing people different ways of doing things. It’s a public space where events and workshops can happen, where a child can have a life-changing experience. And there are intangible benefits that come to a place and people with that garden that can’t be measured or monetised, that play out with each growing season, not just over years, but over decades.

Images from Playing for Time: Fruit and veg collectors at Little Patch of Ground, London 2012; photo by Encounters Arts;  Seed Library poster by Transition San Franscisco; Fruit Routes map by Anne-Marie Culhane and Jo Salter, Loughborough University:  The Edible Garden, Tower Hamlets, London, produced by Phakama and Fabio Santos, photo by Caroline Gervay.

Extract published from Playing for Time – Making Art as if the World Mattered (Oberon Books), £16.99. Copyright Lucy Neal.

The making of Playing for Time will be discussed by the book’s editor Charlotte Du Cann at a talk on Monday 27th April, 2pm at Southwold Library.

Sustainable Nick – A souvenir issue

SB newsletter NICK PRINTThis week saw the departure of one of Sustainable Bungay’s key movers and shakers, Nick Watts. To celebrate his very active presence amongst the group and to wish him well the comms wing of SB wrote and produced a special newsletter as a farewell card. Here it is!

Welcome to our souvenir issue of Sustainable Nick! A newsletter all about our fellow community activist, the grassroots economist, winemaker and grower and sharpest notetaker on the block, Nick Watts.

After 20 years living in this fine old town, and six in the challenging new era of Transition culture, Nick is moving with his family to South Wales. In celebration here is our autumn edition that charts his unforgettable contribution to the group.

Nick burst into Sustainable Bungay our annual Christmas party in 2008, and almost immediately took up his notepad and become the Secretary for all our core group meetings. His organising skills and dynamic energies have been key to all our activities from Give and Take Days to Green Drinks to running the Greenpeace Tea Tent in 2011. He also seeded and led several innovative new projects (see below) and inspired many folk to get involved.

Communicating the hidden worlds of finance however was what perhaps fired him the most. ‘Skintnick’ felt people really needed to know the facts around the fragile and illusory nature of our monetary system. His talk, A Tale of Two Curves – On the conspiracy of silence on natural limits and economic growth in June 2010 was a witty, full-on whistle-stop tour of economic history, and explored ways in which we might become resilient within the Transition framework and the local economy.

IMG_6654During 2011-12 when the Occupy movement had the world thinking about money in a new light, Nick was often to be found at the Occupy Norwich camp speaking about the radical changes needed in the global banking system. He also organised a thrilling nighttime march up to Norwich Castle to commemorate Robert Kett and the Norfolk uprising against the “hard-hearted elite” in 1549.

In an interview with co-chair Mark Watson, Nick explained how being involved with the Transition movement changed his life. “You become friends with people you’re working with on a common understanding, for a common good. Transition casts a different light on everything you do. You’re thinking in a bigger way about the systems that underpin our lives, but acting from where you are.

Image2084“You’re simplifying your life so you are less dependent on a high income, high energy use and the industrial food system. Peak Oil presents the very real possibility of these fossil-fuelled ways of life being taken away. I see it as a responsibility, especially if you have children, to take it seriously.

“None of knows exactly what is on the cards for the future – but our bet (6-4 favourite) is that Sustainable Nick will make the valley he is headed for a greener, more switched on and joyful place.

One thing is for sure: we will all miss him here in low-carbon Bungay. Thanks for everything Nick and happy moving!

Images: On the move: Nick with the all-important chair, Give and Take Day, 2011; making medicinal raspberry wine, Plants for Life workshop, 2012.

Happy Mondays

IMG_6400

Food is never far from Sustainable Bungay’s collective heart and from the off our events have been accompanied by homemade cakes, seasonal soups and even our local take on tapas. But it was Nick who suggested we should turn eating into the main event.

Like a lot of good ideas Happy Monday was dreamt up in the pub – it was to be a regular meal demonstrating much of what SB is all about; supporting the local economy, working co-operatively, and celebrating farmers and gardeners in and around Bungay.

Unlike a lot of ideas discussed over a pint this one has grown into a very real and successful venture – thanks in no small part to Nick, who having come up with the idea, organised the first meal (a pie and mash night) in May 2011.

33 Happy Mondays later and almost 2000 meals have left the kitchen since that pub chat. Nick has been involved with every one of them; cooking, supplying home-grown vegetables, buying local produce and demonstrating his formidable washing-up skills. We are now left with a wonderful legacy for the Community Kitchen the future. Cheers Nick!

IMG_4445On the shelf

As a one-time booksearcher and keen to keep folk abreast of the thinking around peak oil, climate change and economic downturn, Nick devised a special lending shelf at Bungay Library. Over 50 book, as well as printed documents on everything from dig gardening to the debt crisis, were available to anyone who was interested. The Library has since disbanded the section and the books are now available for sale. An invaluable resource for people looking at the bigger picture. Green and Transition titles will be available at Happy Mondays on 19th October(see Simon Bloom)

In brief 

IMG_2179-300x225In 2010 Nick took the lead in creating the Bungay Library Community Garden. In January Sustainble Bungay held a permaculture course taught by Graham Burnet off Spiral Seed. Their mission: transforming the bare brick courtyard into a flourishing showcase garden. Working to the collaborative design Nick co-ordinated a team of volunteers, who built raised beds and filled them with donated soil and compost, plants and trees, as well as installed rainwater butts and a composting bin. The Gardem opened the following year with a great celebration has since hosted dozens of events, including the bi-annual Give and Grow plant and produce swaps, also organised by Nick. It’s now a hub for many of SB’s activities and a peaceful and sustainble green space for all the community to enjoy.

for-dad-204NR35 was another plant-based enterprise devised by SB’s green-fingered entrepreneur. Based on Bungay’s postcode the NR35 (‘Natural Resources’ 35) group explore “how to use our skills, knowledge and labour to generate an income by sustainably managing/harvesting the resources which are wildly abundant around our rural market town.” The results include the harvesting and distributing of fruit and vegetable gluts, some of which are supplied to local restaurants and grocers, play area regeneration, dead hedge making and building a communal firewood store.

Tea with Everything; Nick, Margaret and Charlotte at the SB Tea Tent, Greenpeace Fair, 2011The knowledge: Nick (and cat) at Bungay Community Library party, January 2013; Quartermaster’s stores: Nick and fellow members of NR35 with firewood stash, October 2012

The Hemp Field – talk at Bungay Community Library, Sunday 28th September, 11am

chapter 2Our final event of The Dye Garden season, The Hemp Field promises to be a fascinating exploration into the hidden history of local hemp production -one of the world’s most useful and sustainable crops.

Three hundred years ago, the Waveney valley was at the heart of the East Anglian hemp weaving industry. Today, no active traces of the industry remain, but has left legacy of place names and a precious heritage of textiles in local museums.

Tim Holt-Wilson (former Curator of Diss Museum) will give a talk explaining the Waveney hempenspun and allied linen industries and their legacy in landscape and culture today.

The Dye Garden
is part of the Library Community Garden, created by Sustainable Bungay in 2009. The showcase central bed changes each year and during the growing year the Garden hosts plant and produce exchanges, events and workshops around its chosen theme from bee-friendly flowers to medicine plants.Our 2014 events have looked at key dye and fabric plants from the perspective of artists, makers, curators and growers and have provided a practical and imaginative insight into our relationships with cloth and colour through time.

We’ve found out about the great blue plants – woad and indigo, dipped cloth into blackcurrants and marigolds, been on the art trial with Black Dog Arts, swapped fennel seeds and pressed apples, learned how to prune pear and cherry trees, and marvelled at the giant artichoke in the central bed, along with St John’s wort, cosmos, dahlias, feverfew, madder, green alkanet and a host of colourful and useful flowers.

Hope to see you at our final event on Sunday! In October we will be preparing the garden for winter and the swapover to our 2015 theme, Helpful Herbs.  All welcome.

The Hemp Field will be on Sunday 28th September, 2014 at 11am at Bungay Community Library, Wharton Street, Bungay. Free. Donations welcome. Further information: www.sustainablebungay.com. or contact Charlotte Du Cann theseakaleproject@hotmail.co.uk (01502  722419)

 

Library Community Garden and Bungay Gardens Art Trail – Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th July, 12 noon – 4pm

5124818We’re on the Trail! This weekend the Library Community Garden is taking part in the Black Dog Arts Garden Art Trail. We’ll be here to guide you round the permaculture garden Sustainable Bungay created in 2009, where we keep a showcase bed and run a progamme of events around different themes, from bee-friendly flowers to medicine plants.

This year we have focused on dye plants and Mary Sprake from Black Dog Arts – who gave a great talk here on woad in April – will be displaying some of her true blue fabrics in this very green courtyard.

Each year Black Dog Arts organises a Garden Art Trail around some of the hidden gardens of Bungay. Here is their invitation: “You can stroll round the town and discover great garden gems and the garden art and craftworks inspired by them.

There are approximately 9 gardens open this year mostly within the town centre but a few will be on the outskirts making this more of a diverse tour. The gardens are picked because they are all well hidden and have their own interesting features.

There will be art in all the gardens consisting of sculpture, ceramics and paintings/drawings and textile work. Also included is our Allotment Society.

BCLG 13.7.2014Refreshments will be provided at one of the gardens.

Proceeds to Black Dog arts to fund workshops in much of the art media.

Cost:
£2.00 for entry to all gardens (though entrance to the library is free)

How to get event passports:
Leaflet maps available from Bungay library in Wharton Street or shops, businesses and community buildings throughout the town.

Further information:
Phone: 01986 893 550

Website: http://www.opengardens.co.uk/open_gardens.php?id=226

THE DYE GARDEN True Blue – a talk about the culture and craft of woad with Mary Sprake – Sunday 20th April, 11am

385px-38_Isatis_tinctoria_LOur first talk in the Dye Garden season will be about the ancient dye plant woad, once the principle source of blue in Europe, before indigo arrived from the East, and artificial dyes were discovered in the 19th century.

On 20th April Mary Sprake of Black Dog Arts will talk about this useful and unusual member of the brassica family and show how the blue dye can be extracted from its leaves and used to dye yarn and cloth. Woad was cultivated extensively in East Anglia (the famous ‘Lavenham blew’ from the medieval wool centre at Lavenham was made from these plants), and woad is still being grown commercially in Norfolk.

Many artists, textile designers and crafts people use woad, as it creates extraordinary hues of blue, as well as being entirely natural and sustainable.

db_2d-scan05_71What is The Dye Garden?

The Dye Garden is part of the permaculture-inspired Library Community Garden, created by Sustainable Bungay in 2009. The showcase central bed changes each year and during the growing year the Garden hosts plant and produce exchanges, events and workshops around its chosen theme. This year we are growing dye and textile plants, and there are already several in situ – including of course a woad plant now getting ready to flower!

Our 2014 programme will be looking at several key plants from different angles: from the perspective of artists, makers, curators and growers. Each event will provide a practical and imaginative insight into our relationships with fabrics and colour through time.

During the growing year of 2014, we’ll be journeying into the myths and culture behind certain plants: visiting the flax and hemp fields of the Waveney Valley; the silk weavers and madder sellers of Norwich; discovering archaic woad, African indigo and how to make paints from local wild flora.

Arts, culture and wellbeing

1a-woadspoolThe Dye Garden is being curated by Sustainable Bungay’s Arts, Culture and Wellbeing group. The project aims to celebrate the  beauty of ordinary things and our place within the fabric of life, within a frame of ecological and social change.

Plants can act as a wonderful bridge between people, a springboard to our imaginations, and open a door to other places and times, knowledge and wonder. So as well as a skill and knowledge-share about plants and textiles, the garden and its events are also an exploration of creativity and wellbeing within the community.

Everyone is invited!

True Blue – a talk about the culture and craft of woad will take place at Bungay Community Library on 20th April at 11am. Free entry (donations welcome).

Images: botanical drawing of woad plant; woad balls being stacked in Norfolk; woad-dyed wool (from www.woad.org.uk/)

Dye Garden Opening – Saturday 22nd March, 10am

7dfc654090e92e065b330ee51ff66b6dThere will be an informal opening and introduction to The Dye Garden on Saturday 22nd March, at 10am, just before Sustainable Bungay’s annual Give and Take Day. This will mark the beginning of the Library Community Garden season of events, which will include workshops and talks about the dye and fabric plants that are being showcased this year in the central bed, as well as our regular seed, plants and produce swaps in May and October.

Some of the plants are already making their appearance, so if you would like to have a look round and hear about this year’s new project do swing by the Garden tomorrow. All welcome! Charlotte Du Cann

Image: plant material and the colours they yield for Dine (Navajo) fabrics in  South West USA

 

Green Drinks – Give and Take Fashion – Tuesday 4th March

knitting 2The fashion and fabrics business is one of the largest and most polluting industries  on the planet.  How can we have a more sustainable relationship with the people and plants who make our clothes and other materials?

At this month’s Green Drinks, ex-fashion editor and curator of this year’s Dye Garden Project, Charlotte Du Cann, will be looking at ways we can individually  and collectively ‘downshift the wardrobe’, including running sewing circles, clothes swaps and Give and Take Days. Do come along and join in the conversation.

Meanwhile here is a great article on textiles  published in our winter issue of Transition Free Press.

Textiles in Transition

by William Lana

Textiles is a truly global industry. In many ways it was the starting point of the industrialisation of the world, kicked off in the 18th and 19th centuries by Britain’s cotton industry and trade. Labour-intensive garment production was one of the earliest to adopt the ‘logic’ of globalisation and in the last 50 years has been moving from the high-wage countries to lower and lower wage countries in a so-called race to the bottom…

The globalisation of the textile industry has meant that companies have shifted focus away from production and instead ‘bigged-up’ brand and marketing.  Production is merely supply a management issue. This has led to a systemic exploitation of workers, including excessive hours, lack of job security, poverty wages, ill-health and denial of trade union rights.

To a transitioner this feels very unsatisfactory. We want to know where the raw materials have been grown, raised or made. We want to know what the energy input has been, how far the garment has come, and what toxic outputs have been created through its production. Who has made it and under what conditions?  Quite apart from the concern that our bum doesn’t look big in it.

When we opened our Greenfibres shop in the mid 1990’s I remember some people walking by, saying “Organic textiles?! You don’t eat your socks!”. Apart from being incorrect (60% of the cotton harvest is cotton seed used for animal feed and vegetable oil) it made me realise just how disconnected we are from our textiles. They are all around us (literally), internationally employ over 26 million people (not including over 100 million farmers who grow cotton and other materials), and yet we have a very distant relationship to them.

sewing-sessiontara-et-alasdairHow far have we come in 20 years?  Hmmm…. not terribly.  I’m heartened to see the real growth of the make and mend movement, that £13 million worth of organic textiles were sold in the UK in 2012 and that documentaries about the industry (such as Dirty White Gold investigating the high suicide rate of Indian cotton farmers). But it still feels like early days. Who’s asking questions about energy use?  (one t-shirt requires approx. 1.7 kg of fossil fuel and generates approx. 4 kg of CO2). Can we even return to a less energy intensive textile industry? Who remembers how to ret or scutch flax?  Where are the businesses who know how to process these fibres?  Why is 95% of the cotton grown in the US from GM seed?

So what if we wanted to start bringing fibres and fabrics back home, what might that look like?  Well, for starters …

  • we’d get busy planting some hemp (and make it easier to get a licence – mine took 18 months)
  • we’d re-introduce basic sewing into the primary school curriculum
  • we’d pass legislation requiring historical information to be included on the barcode of garments, e.g. where the raw materials came from, and where the garment was made (a pair of Lee jeans can travel 40,000 miles from field to shelf).

Meanwhile what can the average transitioner do to side-step fast fashion?  We can swap clothes with friends, purchase outerwear from charity shops, and if we do buy new items (for example underwear) consider an ethical supplier. If you buy textiles that you love and respect, you’re much less likely to add them to the 3 million ton annual pile which ends up in our bins.  In a nutshell, we should be buying fewer textiles, of better quality, which can be mended.  Now back to my tasty organic cotton socks.

William Lana co-founded the organic textile company Greenfibres in 1996 and is a trustee of Transition Network. He was Chair of the Soil Association’s Organic Textile Standards Committee from 2001-2012 and helped found the Organic Trade Board in 2008.

For further reading: John Thackera on Routledge’s upcoming Handbook on Fashion and Sustainability http://www.resilience.org/stories/2014-01-07/a-whole-new-cloth-politics-and-the-fashion-system

Charlotte Du Cann will be introducing The Dye Garden on Saturday 22nd March, 10am at the Bungay Community Library (before Sustainable Bungay’s Eighth Give and Take Day)

Images: girl at knitting workshop at Transition Kensal to Kilburn Reskilling Day by Jonathan Goldberg : Transition reskilling.

Spring Clean! – Give and Take Day – Saturday 22nd March

Give and Take 2Our eighth Give and Take Day (22nd March) is happening just after spring equinox, perfect timing for a good spring clean! So why not bring along your unwanted items of clothing, furniture, garden and household equipment, books, CDs and DVDs to the Community Centre and pick up something you might need. Just make sure that anything you bring is in decent, usable (or at least reparable) condition. This can even include electrical goods as our qualified PAT tester will be there.

And remember, no money exchanges hands – it’s Give, it’s Take, and everything is free (although we do welcome donations towards room hire costs).

Give and Take Days have become an integral part of the ‘remit’ of Sustainable Bungay since we began holding them once or twice a year in March 2009. When the group first formed after the Climate Change conference in Emmanuel Church in 2007, we wanted to know how we could engage locally in response to changing climate conditions. What could we do here?

Since joining the Transition network in 2008, the group’s activities are now also informed by factors such as the decreasing availability of cheap fossil fuel energy and widespread economic downturn.

Profligate waste is one of the biggest problems in our present throwaway culture, whether it’s food, clothing or technology. Fossil fuels are embedded in the production of almost everything in our lives, and carbon emissions from waste exert a significant impact on the climate.

So Give and Take Days are not just about getting rid of stuff and picking up more stuff. They also aim to bring attention to our use of resources and make sure less of that stuff ends up in landfill sites, where it will sit for a very long time, emitting! These modest events have so far meant that about 35 tonnes of potential landfill has found a new home.

This time there will be an upcycling table in connection with the 2014 Dye Garden at Bungay Library, and we’ll be joined again by Emmaus from Ditchingham. Give and Take Days are also a great opportunity to meet up with friends and neighbours – and to enjoy refreshments prepared by the Happy Monday Community Kitchen crew. Everyone welcome. Hope to see you there! Mark Watson

Give and Take Day: Saturday 22nd March at the Community Centre, Upper Olland Street, 11am-2pm. For large pickups please contact Eloise: eloisewilkinson@gmail.com or call 07842 897172

Where the wild things are in Bungay

longtailedtit babiesBillwebcropAs the season turns and everythings starts growing and singing and coming out of hibernation (including ourselves!) two great nature projects are springing into action. Rose Titchiner describes Wild about Bungay , the Community Wildlife Project and Blog now in its second year and the new Bungay Wildlife Monitor group

Wild about Bungay

 

The seeds for the Wild About Bungay community wildlife project came from Jasmine Lingwood and has since been carried forward and evolved by Jasmine’s brothers, Chris and Terry Reeve and members of the project.

The Wild About Bungay project, encourages everyone to celebrate and record the flora and fauna that we see and find all around us in Bungay and in the gardens, meadows, commons, verges, paths and waterways around the town – nothing is too commonplace or mundane to share and celebrate!  Anyone can contribute. Email us your sightings and photos and well will upload them onto Bungay’s

very own community wildlife blog for all to see and enjoy throughout the year.

The project is expanding this year, to encourage Bungay schools to contribute their wildlife sightings to the blog. A Bungay wildlife photographic exhibition will be held at the Fisher Theatre in October 2014 and a book celebrating Bungay wildlife is planned for Autumn 2015. The project is also keen to assist with the long-term, in-depth habitat survey work of the newly formed Bungay WildWatch group.

Check out the Wild About Bungay community wildlife blog for more information on sending in your sightings and photos or becoming involved in the project:  www.wildaboutbungay.com 

common newt Ian A Kirk

Bungay Wildlife Monitor group

 

Bungay Wildlife Watch Group has been formed as an umbrella group for all those who are interested in, care about or are responsible for wildlife and wildlife habitats in and around Bungay.

Over the next two years the group is planning to conduct in-depth, year round biological surveys of the wildlife habitats and waterways around Bungay. We would also like to keep a record of the current and potential future management plans of wildlife areas around the town.

The group is in the process of setting up a website and online biological recording system to log records for our own data as well as to feed records into the county biological recording systems of Suffolk and Norfolk.

As well as landowners and organisations involved in environmental or habitat management around Bungay, we’re keen to hear from people with a particular interest in local flora and fauna. We’re also considering running courses and workshops to help deepen our knowledge of the extraordinary wildlife and ecology of this area.

We hope to have a public meeting mid-March to early April. Until then we are discussing ideas and would welcome any suggestions, experience or help. We’ll be arranging a Dyke Dipping Day in late April or early May -to learn more about Bungay’s reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates.  with John Baker  County Recorder for Reptiles and Amphibians in Suffolk. If you are interested please email Rose Titchiner on: siriusowl@gmail.com

Images: common smooth newt by Ian A. Kirk; longtailed tits at Castle Mills by Bill Davis

All the latest! Transition Free Press Winter edition is here

DSCF0075 (1)Happy New Year everyone! If you haven’t seen the fourth winter edition of Transition Free Press it’s now available in Bungay and on-line. Keep an eye out for the real-life paper copies (£1) at all our events this year, including Happy Mondays, Film Nights and Green Drinks.

This is the final issue of the 2013 pilot in which the national  grassroots newspaper broadcast and celebrated all aspects of Transition culture – from economics, energy and food to wellbeing, books, people, stuff and sport. For a full editorial A-Z of the latest issue read the December update on the TFP news blog.

TFP_Issue4_Winter2013_FrontPage_webLooking back at the paper’s first year Transition co-founder, Rob Hopkins wrote:

The fourth edition of Transition Free Press has just come out, and it is a Thing of Great Beauty. Transition has long created spaces in which people can engage their creativity, and TFP is one of the shining examples of that.  It models a different approach to telling stories, to building networks, and to building a movement.

Meanwhile Sustainable Bungay’s comms crew are preparing the next Winter-into-Spring newsletter, so do get in touch if you have any stories or events to share in our diary. Charlotte Du Cann theseakaleproject@hotmail.co.uk

 

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